The Dark Knight Rises

The Dark Knight Rises closes out director Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy. Batman returns eight years after the events of ‘The Dark Knight’ to combat Bane, who has seized control of Gotham City and threatens to destroy it completely. Batman is joined in this movie by thief Selina Kyle (don’t call her Catwoman, nobody else in this film does) and John Blake, a GCPD officer who reminds Batman why Gotham City needs its heroes.

The story borrows key plot points from the ‘Knightfall’ story arc, where Batman must return from crippling injuries, after suffering defeat at the hands of Bane.

A large part of the second and third acts are also based on the ‘No Man’s Land’ storyline, where Gotham city is declared a disaster zone after an earthquake, isolating it from the rest of America.

At just under three hours long this is a huge movie to take in. The pace of this film carries it well and manages to resolve character arcs and plot points that reach as far back as ‘Batman Begins’, without feeling as if there’s too much going on in this movie. It also does well at making new characters matter. Not a single scene or plot point is filler in this film; everything ties back or reaches forward with purpose and good reason. The scale and scope of events are epic without losing any realism, and although stylistic, it looks very different to the first two movies, and it feels like it belongs securely as the final piece of a near-perfect comic book movie saga.

As with most Batman films, the villain is the showpiece. Tom Hardy’s portrayal of Bane is menacing, beastly, animalistic and powerful. But it is also carefully nuanced and thoughtful. If Heath Ledger deserved his Oscar for his portrayal of the Joker in the last installment, then it is a great injustice that Hardy isn’t seen as deserved for what he does for this rendition of Bane. It could just as easily be his movie as it is Christian Bale’s, and he uses every inch of his acting ability in an attempt to break each finger of Batman’s grip on the film.

The fight scenes are bone-crunchingly brutal and the action is visceral. The truest parts about this film are the ones where these scenes break free of the writing and acting and emit pure primal force.

The comic book version of ‘Knightfall’ was a year-long journey into innovative storytelling when it was published. On the heels of killing Superman, DC comics came up with a way to replace Batman that would renew interest in a flagging comic book industry. For its time it was tightly written. Its logical progression of cause and effect that lead to the wearing down and breaking of a hero was gripping. It introduced new characters that have lasted in the almost thirty years since, and have rightly taken their place in the Batman rogues gallery, alongside icons such as the Joker and Catwoman.

Nine years after ‘Knightfall’ was published, ‘No Man’s Land’ would serve to reinvigorate the Batman character once again. Its sprawling, far-reaching story was even more ambitious an event than ‘Knightfall’. Its gritty artwork perfectly encapsulated a mood of dire hopelessness and ruin. Its writing was an unflinching look into even the deepest and darkest places society will go to when the world has given up. It added new layers, and new motivations to every character in the Batman mythology while never deviating from the core of who these sixty-year-old masterworks of American fiction are.

The Dark Knight Rises does well to take the central points of both ‘Knightfall’ and ‘No Man’s Land’ and refashion them into the concluding chapter of a rare cinematic experience.

A journey through the power of an ideal.

The birth of that ideal.

Standing resilient when that ideal is tested.

And rising from the rubble so that the ideal becomes everlasting.